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U.S. Casualties in Operation Iraqi Freedom April 2003 - History

U.S. Casualties in Operation Iraqi Freedom April 2003 - History


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U.S. Casualties in Operation Iraqi Freedom April 2003

Total Casualties73
Service MemberAgeDate
Sgt. Jacob L. Butler24Apr. 1, 2003
Lance Cpl. Joseph B. Maglione22Apr. Brian E. Anderson26Apr. 2, 2003
Sgt. George E. Buggs31Apr. 2, 2003
Master Sgt. George A. Fernandez36Apr. 2, 2003
Pfc. Christian D. Gurtner19Apr. 2, 2003
Lt. Nathan D. White30Apr. 2, 2003
Capt. James F. Adamouski29Apr. 3, 2003
Pfc. Chad E. Bales20Apr. 3, 2003
Spc. Mathew G. Boule22Apr. 3, 2003
Cpl. Mark A. Evnin21Apr. 3, 2003
Chief Warrant Officer Erik A. Halvorsen40Apr. 3, 2003
Chief Warrant Officer Scott Jamar32Apr. 3, 2003
Staff Sgt. Nino D. Livaudais23Apr. Ryan P. Long21Apr. Donald S. Oaks Jr20Apr. 3, 2003
Sgt. Michael F. Pedersen26Apr. 3, 2003
Chief Warrant Officer Eric A. Smith41Apr. 1st Class Randall S. Rehn33Apr. 3, 2003
Capt. Russell B. Rippetoe27Apr. Todd J. Robbins33Apr. Wilfred D. Bellard20Apr. 4, 2003
Spc. Daniel Francis J. Cunningham33Apr. 4, 2003
Staff Sgt. Wilbert Davis40Apr. 4, 2003
Capt. Travis A. Ford30Apr. 4, 2003
Cpl. Bernard G. Gooden22Apr. 4, 2003
Pvt. Devon D. Jones19Apr. Edward J. Korn31Apr. 4, 2003
1st Lt. Brian M. McPhillips25Apr. 4, 2003
Sgt. Duane R. Rios25Apr. Benjamin W. Sammis29Apr. Erik H. Silva22Apr. 1st Class Paul R. Smith19Apr. Tristan N. Aitken31Apr. 5, 2003
Staff Sgt. Stevon A. Booker34Apr. 5, 2003
Spc. Larry K. Brown22Apr. 5, 2003
Pfc. Anthony S. Miller19Apr. 5, 2003
1st Sgt. Edward Smith38Apr. Gregory P. Huxley, Jr19Apr. 6, 2003
Pvt. Kelley S. Prewitt24Apr. 6, 2003
Lance Cpl. Andrew Julian Aviles18Apr. 7, 2003
Capt. Eric B. Das30Apr. 7, 2003
Staff Sgt. Lincoln D. Hollinsaid27Apr. 7, 2003
2nd Lt. Jeffrey J. Kaylorr24Apr. 7, 2003
Cpl. Jesus Martin Antonio Medellin21Apr. 7, 2003
Spc. Mitchell35Apr. 7, 2003
Maj. William R. Watkins III37Apr. Henry L. 8, 2003
Pfc. Juan Guadalupe Garza Jr.20Apr. 8, 2003
Sgt. 1st Class John W. Marshall50Apr. Jason M. Meyer23Apr. 8, 2003
Staff Sgt. Scott D. Sather29Apr. Robert A. Stever36Apr. 8, 2003
Gunnery Sgt. Jeffrey E. Bohr, Jr.39Apr. 10, 2003
Staff Sgt. Terry W. Hemingway39Apr. Riayan A. Tejeda26Apr. 11, 2003
Cpl. Jesus A. Gonzalez22Apr. 12, 2003
Marine Lance Cpl. David Edward Owens Jr.20Apr. 12, 2003
Spc. Gil Mercado25Apr. 13, 2003
Spc. Thomas A. Foley III23Apr. 14, 2003
Cpl. Armando Ariel Gonzalez25Apr. 14, 2003
Spc. Richard A. Goward32Apr. 14, 2003
Pfc. Joseph P. Mayek20Apr. Jason David Mileo20Apr. John T. Rivero23Apr. 17, 2003
Chief Warrant Officer Andrew Todd Arnold30Apr. 22, 2003
Spc. Roy Russell Buckley24Apr. 22, 2003
Chief Warrant Officer Robert William Channell Jr.36Apr. 22, 2003
Lance Cpl. Alan Dinh Lam19Apr. 22, 2003
Army Sgt. Troy David Jenkins25Apr. 24, 2003
Spc. Narson B. Sullivan21Apr. 25, 2003
1st Lt. Osbaldo Orozco26Apr. 25, 2003
1st Sgt. Joe J. Garza43Apr. 28, 2003

Battle of Baghdad (2003)

The Battle of Baghdad, also known as the Fall of Baghdad, was a military invasion of Baghdad that took place in early April 2003, as part of the invasion of Iraq.

United States-led coalition victory

Three weeks into the invasion of Iraq, Coalition Forces Land Component Command elements, led by the U.S. Army 3rd Infantry Division moved into Baghdad. The United States declared victory on April 14, and President George W. Bush gave his Mission Accomplished Speech on May 1.

Baghdad suffered serious damage to its civilian infrastructure, economy, and cultural inheritance from the fighting, as well as looting and arson. During the invasion, the Al-Yarmouk Hospital in south Baghdad saw a steady rate of about 100 new patients an hour. [7]

Over 2,000 Iraqi soldiers as well as 34 coalition troops were killed in the battle. After the fall of Baghdad, Coalition forces entered the city of Kirkuk on April 10 and Tikrit on April 15, 2003.


Disease and nonbattle injuries sustained by a U.S. Army Brigade Combat Team during Operation Iraqi Freedom

Background: A longitudinal cohort analysis of disease nonbattle injuries (DNBI) sustained by a large combat-deployed maneuver unit has not been performed.

Methods: A descriptive analysis was undertaken to evaluate for DNBI casualty care statistics incurred by a U.S. Army Brigade Combat Team (BCT) during a counterinsurgency campaign of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Results: Of the 4,122 soldiers deployed, there were 1,324 DNBI with 5 (0.38%) deaths, 208 (15.7%) medical evacuations (MEDEVAC), and 1,111 (83.9%) returned to duty. The DNBI casualty rate for the BCT was 257.0/1,000 soldier combat-years. Females, compared with males, had a significantly increased incidence rate ratio for becoming a DNBI casualty 1.67 (95% CI 1.37, 2.04). Of 47 female soldiers receiving MEDEVAC 35 (74%) were for pregnancy-related issues. Musculoskeletal injuries (50.4%) and psychiatric disorders (23.3%) were the most common body systems involved with DNBI casualties. Among the BCT cohort the psychiatric DNBI casualty rate and suicide rate were 59.8 and 0.58 per 1,000 soldier combat-years. The BCT cohort incidence rates for common musculoskeletal injuries per 1,000 combat-years were as follows: ankle sprain 15.3, anterior cruciate ligament rupture 3.3 and shoulder dislocation 1.2.

Conclusions: Musculoskeletal injuries and psychiatric disorders accounted for 74% of the total DNBI casualties, and 43% of the DNBI casualties requiring subsequent MEDEVAC. The BCT cohort had a suicide rate nearly four times greater than previously reported, and selected musculoskeletal injury incidence rates were fivefold greater than the general population.


Operation Iraqi Freedom

The armed conflict called Operation Iraqi Freedom began with an invasion of Iraq, led primarily by the United States with the assistance of Great Britain and other allies the conflict lasted from 2003 to 2011. The invasion was initiated based on intelligence that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction (WMDs), and that Saddam Hussein was harboring and supporting al-Qaeda terrorists. The lack of evidence of any WMDs later became a political flashpoint. One goal of the invasion was to overthrow the oppressive regime of Saddam Hussein to establish a free and independent Iraqi government, democratically elected by its people.

Significant opposition arose in 2002–2003 during the run up to the war, with sixty-three percent of Americans desiring a diplomatic solution in Iraq. However, sixty percent of Americans supported military action if diplomatic efforts failed. In October 2002, when Congress passed a resolution authorizing military action, the six-person congressional delegation from Arkansas voted in favor, with a single dissenting vote, from Congressman Vic Snyder. Reminiscent of the Vietnam War era, protestors conducted numerous events across the nation. The largest consisted of between 100,000 and 400,000 held in New York City on February 15, 2003. As the invasion loomed, support for the war hinged on United Nations (UN) approval. A USA Today/CNN/Gallup poll showed that sixty percent of Americans supported military intervention as long as UN support was obtained. After the initial invasion in 2003, a majority of Americans supported military efforts. However, beginning in late 2004, public opinion shifted, declaring the invasion a mistake. By 2006, a majority of Americans felt that it was time for the coalition to get out of Iraq, although it was five years before this occurred.

The war’s first phase was a conventional-style war fought against the Iraqi military forces in March and April 2003, while the second phase was a protracted conflict against an opposing insurgency by occupying U.S. and coalition forces lasting from 2003 to 2011. Many Arkansans were deployed as part of regular military units, and the Arkansas National Guard deployed approximately 10,000 soldiers and airmen during the over eight-year war, resulting in twenty-three deaths of Guard members.

Back home, life continued uninterrupted by the war for most Americans. Unlike earlier conflicts, no rationing or major shortages impacted day-to-day activities. Although the war was covered extensively in the media for the first two or three years, coverage as well as public attention eventually waned. However, hometowns organized care packages for individuals, and school children sent packages, letters, and cards, especially around holidays. The biggest impact was on the families of the troops deployed, as well as their communities.

The Center of Military History established the following seven completed campaign phases for Operation Iraqi Freedom:

Phase 1: Liberation of Iraq, March 19, 2003–May 1, 2003

Phase 2: Transition of Iraq, May 2, 2003–June 28, 2004

Phase 3: Iraqi Governance, June 29, 2004–December 15, 2005

Phase 4: National Resolution, December 16, 2005–January 9, 2007

Phase 5: Iraqi Surge, January 10, 2007–December 31, 2008

Phase 6: Iraqi Sovereignty, January 1, 2009–August 31, 2010

Phase 7: Operation New Dawn, September 1, 2010–December 15, 2011

The invasion of Iraq began on March 19, 2003, with the “shock and awe” bombing campaign conducted by the United States and its coalition partners. This was followed by the U.S.-led invasion that rapidly defeated the military forces of Iraq, resulting in the collapse of Saddam Hussein’s government and forcing him into hiding. He was captured in December 2003 and executed in 2006 by the Iraqi government for crimes against his own citizens. Two units of the Arkansas National Guard were present during the initial invasion. The 296 th Medical Company, Ground Ambulance from Charleston (Franklin County) provided combat medical evacuation support, while the 1123 rd Truck Company from Blytheville (Mississippi County) provided logistical support in delivery of supplies for invading forces.

After the overthrow of Saddam Hussein, Iraq experienced major outbreaks of violence throughout the country. Much of this was sectarian violence between Sunni and Shia Muslims. Under Saddam Hussein, a Sunni, the minority Sunnis ruled harshly over the Shias. After Saddam Hussein’s defeat and execution, a power vacuum allowed Shias to exact reprisals for years of Sunni oppression. Additionally, the United States had not planned well for the follow-up operations after the war ended. The most difficult challenge for U.S. and coalition forces was to maintain order and security across Iraq, as they found themselves under increasing attacks from numerous insurgent groups within the country, primarily al-Qaeda, Fedayeen Saddam, and Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr’s Mahdi army, also known as Jaysh al-Mahdi (JAM).

In April 2004 the Arkansas National Guard deployed its largest unit, the Thirty-Ninth Infantry Brigade Combat Team (IBCT), consisting of over 3,000 soldiers. The Thirty-Ninth IBCT, assigned to the First Cavalry Division, spent the next twelve months stationed in Baghdad and surrounding areas. It was one of the first two National Guard brigades called to duty, along with another from North Carolina, and the first National Guard light infantry brigade deployed. During the year-long deployment, the Thirty-Ninth IBCT, stationed at Camp Cooke in Taji, Iraq, conducted full-spectrum combat operations. The First Cavalry Division reorganized its forces, resulting in the Thirty-Ninth IBCT’s First Battalion, 153 rd Infantry being placed under control of Third Brigade, First Calvary Division in the International Zone (or “Green Zone”), in Baghdad’s Karrada District. In return, the Thirty-Ninth IBCT received Second Squadron, Seventh Cavalry of the First Cavalry Division. After a year-long deployment of active combat, the brigade returned to Arkansas in April 2005 it had thirty-three soldiers killed, fifteen of whom were Arkansas National Guard members.

Operation Iraqi Freedom was unique in that it was the first time Americans at home had the opportunity to witness war in real time. National and local news media were embedded from the beginning of the invasion with troops as they entered Iraq, reporting daily on events and activities. On the homefront, the Arkansas brigade was featured almost daily in articles in the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. An embedded journalist from the newspaper, Amy Schlesing, and a host of rotating photographers joined the Arkansas forces in 2004–2005 and again in 2008. They lived day-to-day life alongside the troops, sharing all the dangers and hardships. The articles and photographs allowed Arkansans to witness the war from the perspective of their own sons, daughters, husbands, and wives. The first deployment was also highlighted in a 2004 Discovery Times Channel documentary film titled Off to War. The ten-part series detailed daily activities, combat, and life in a war zone with two companies of Arkansas soldiers.

In June 2004, governance of Iraq returned to Iraqi control with plans to conduct the first-ever democratic elections. On January 30, 2005, parliamentary elections were held in order to begin the process of writing a new constitution. The elections were touted as the first free elections with inclusion of all groups in Iraq’s history. However, with the election of Nouri al-Maliki as prime minister, sectarian tensions increased, and the Sunni minority became increasingly alienated by the new government.

As U.S. and coalition casualties rose significantly in 2006, President George W. Bush desired to increase troop levels in an attempt to bring stability and peace. Although opposed by some in Congress, President Bush announced his plan to increase U.S. troop strength by over 20,000 personnel in January 2007, which became known as the “Surge.” Casualties increased drastically, making 2007 the deadliest year for U.S. forces, although levels of violence began to subside later that year.

The Arkansas National Guard’s Thirty-Ninth Infantry Brigade Combat Team deployed over 3,000 soldiers in January 2008 as part of the surge forces, assisting in the creation of a less violent Iraq. The Thirty-Ninth IBCT headquarters were placed in command of over 4,000 soldiers at Camp Liberty in Baghdad. Although most of its subordinate commands were placed under command of other active duty headquarters throughout Iraq, it maintained control over the First Battalion, 153 rd Infantry Regiment. The First Battalion, 206 th Field Artillery Regiment was responsible for base defense in Taji, Iraq. The Second Battalion, 153 rd Infantry, stationed at Al Asad Airbase, provided security for convoys between Al Asad and the Syrian border. The First Squadron, 151 st Cavalry Regiment conducted convoy security for long-haul resupply convoys from Tallil, Iraq, northward to Camp Liberty in Baghdad, as well as U.S. bases farther north in Taji and Balad. The brigade suffered two non-battle-related deaths during the ten-month deployment.

An agreement in late 2008 established new rules regarding U.S. military activity and established a timeframe for the eventual withdrawal of all U.S. forces. All U.S. forces withdrew from Iraqi cities in 2009, followed on August 19, 2010, by the departure of the last U.S. combat brigade, leaving only 52,000 U.S. troops stationed in Iraq. After Iraq became responsible for its own security and the role of U.S. forces was reduced, Operation Iraqi Freedom became Operation New Dawn on September 1, 2010.

On December 15, 2011, the U.S. military mission in Iraq officially ended with the lowering of the U.S. flag over Baghdad. The last U.S. troops crossed into Kuwait on December 18, 2011, ending over eight years of occupation by U.S. forces. The Arkansas Army National Guard’s Seventy-Seventh Aviation Brigade Headquarters was one of these last units to leave Iraq, in December.

Over 1.5 million U.S. service men and women, from all military branches, served during Operation Iraqi Freedom, incurring 4,424 deaths. In comparison, Great Britain, the primary coalition partner, sustained only 179 combat deaths during the over eight-year conflict. Although accurate numbers for Iraqi deaths are hard to ascertain due to a lack of Iraqi government figures and reporting prior to 2004, between 2004 and 2008, the Iraqi government estimates that over 85,000 Iraqis died. This included both military and civilian deaths. Total Iraqi deaths from 2003 to 2011 are considered to be well over 100,000, with conflicting reports as high as 650,000 over that same period.

Due to conflict with the terrorist organization ISIS in Iraq, a limited U.S. force returned to assist in the defeat of ISIS and the U.S. began considering sending more troops to assist in establishing stabilization and security.

Several monuments were built in Arkansas related to Operation Iraqi Freedom. Batesville (Independence County) and Bella Vista (Benton County) both have erected small memorials, while the largest is located at Camp Robinson in North Little Rock (Pulaski County).

For additional information:
39 th Brigade Combat Team Historical Files. Arkansas National Guard Museum, Camp Robinson, North Little Rock, Arkansas.

Austin, Lloyd J. III. The Iraq War 2003–2011: Operation Iraqi Freedom 2003–Operation New Dawn 2011. Washington DC: 2012.

“Iraq by the Numbers.” Democratic Policy and Communication Center. https://dpc.senate.gov/docs/fs-112-1-36.pdf (accessed October 27, 2017).

“Iraqi Freedom 2003–2005.” Cavalry Out Post of the 1 st Cavalry Division and Subordinate Commands. http://www.first-team.us/tableaux/chapt_19/ (accessed October 27, 2017).

Munoz, Carlo. “Thousands of U.S. forces may still be needed for post-ISIS Iraq.” Washington Times, http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/may/18/thousands-us-forces-may-still-be-needed-post-isis-/ (accessed October 27, 2017.)

“Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) U.S. Casualty Status.” U.S. Department of Defense. https://www.defense.gov/casualty.pdf (accessed October 27, 2017.)

Off to War. Directed by Brent and Chris Renaud. Discovery Times Channel, 2004.

Schlesing, Amy. The Bowie Brigade: Arkansas National Guard’s 39th Infantry Brigade in Iraq. Little Rock: Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, 2005.


Iraq war casualties

15 years after the Iraq War began, the death toll is still murky U.S. Marines aid a comrade during fighting on the outskirts of Baghdad in April 2003. (Laurent Rebours/AP Iraq in 2019: Calls for a 'True Homeland' met with deadly violence 31 Dec 2019 Generation: War 15 years in the shadow of ceaseless conflict 19 Mar 2018 Another year of relentless violence in Iraq Lest we forget UK showed no real interest in monitoring civilian casualties Besieged: Living and Dying in Fallujah Earlier analysis from IB Iraq War, conflict in Iraq (2003-11) that consisted of two phases: a conventionally fought war in March-April 2003, in which a combined force of troops primarily from the United States and Great Britain invaded Iraq and defeated Iraqi military forces, and a second phase consisting of a U.S.-led occupation of Iraq

Civilian deaths in Iraq war 2003-2020 Statist

  • Vietnam War prior to 1964-US Casualties were Laos-2 killed in 1954 and Vietnam 1946-1954 2 killed see f. ^ Iraq War . See also Casualties of the Iraq War
  • Iran-Iraq War (1980-88), prolonged military conflict between Iran and Iraq. Estimates of total casualties range from 1,000,000 to twice that number. Fighting was ended by a 1988 cease-fire, though the resumption of normal diplomatic relations and the withdrawal of troops did not take place until 1990
  • The top anti-war news and opinions from around the world. Home About Antiwar.com Donate Blog US Casualties Contact Latest News Letters Casualties in Iraq. The Human Cost of Occupation Edited by Margaret Griffis:: Contact : American Military Casualties in Iraq . Date. Total. In Combat. Page last updated 07/19/16 9:22 am EDT : List of U.S. Servicemembers killed since 5/1/03. Put a.
  • See also: U.S. Military Hostile Casualties In Support Of Operations Iraqi Freedom And New Dawn DoD. As of July 15, 2011 [XLS] NEWS LETTER Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing lis
  • Operation Iraqi Freedom Operation New Dawn Operation Octave Shield Operation Odyssey Lightning Operation Spartan Shield Task Force Sinai U.S. Africa Command Operations U.S. Central Command operations The People Behind The Sacrifice Search Our Database. First Name Last Name Date Range Conflict. Home State. Home Town. View By Year & Month. 2020 January February March April May June.

The Iran-Iraq War of 1980-1988 scarred both countries deeply, with horrific fighting at the battlefront and long-range missile attacks on cities. But postwar censuses in Iran and Iraq suggest that the war's death toll may not be nearly as high as is commonly thought. The war is often said to have caused half a million or more deaths. The Battle Deaths Dataset, developed by a team of. The Iran-Iraq war had been going on for five years by that time and both sides sustained significant casualties, reaching into the hundreds of thousands. Within President Ronald Reagan 's National Security Council concern was growing that the war could spread beyond the boundaries of the two belligerents Víctimas de la guerra de Irak - Casualties of the Iraq War. De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre. Véase también: Víctimas de la insurgencia iraquí (2011-presente) Banderas blancas y rojas, que representan muertes iraquíes y estadounidenses, respectivamente, se encuentran en el cuadrilátero de césped de la Biblioteca del Valle en Corvallis, Oregón, campus de la Universidad Estatal de. Iraq: wars and casualties, 13 years on. by Lily Hamourtziadou 19 Mar 2016. Silent enim leges inter arma, wrote Cicero, Roman philosopher, politician, lawyer and political theorist: in times of arms, the laws fall silent.Men and women, soldiers and civilians, must do what they can to save themselves and others, during war what happens in war lies beyond moral judgement, beyond the law.

. Here are the facts and trivia that people are buzzing about. November 2020 Current Events: US News. Thanksgiving History. How U.S. Presidential Elections Work. The Top 6 Drone Cameras of 2020. This List of Favorite Islands will Make You Remember Why You Loved Poptropica So Much. The Top Ten: States with the Most Electoral Votes. A third student study, published this February in Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, looked at reports of violent deaths of Iraqi civilians in the WikiLeaks Iraq War Logs, a collection of U.S. classified military records, and to what extent these deaths matched newspaper reports in the Iraq Body Count database. The result: nearly two-thirds of casualties in the War Logs were unaccounted for by.

During the eight years between Iraq's formal declaration of war on September 22, 1980, and Iran's acceptance of a cease-fire with effect on July 20, 1988, at the very least half a million and. Estimates of the casualties from the conflict in Iraq (beginning with the 2003 US invasion of Iraq, and the ensuing occupation and insurgency) have come in many forms, and the accuracy of the information available on different types of Iraq War casualties varies greatly.. Credible estimates of Iraq War casualties range from 151,000 violent deaths as of June 2006 (per the Iraq Family Health. He was the first man to die for a mistake. Marine 1st Lt. Therrell Shane Childers became the first American combat casualty of the war in Iraq ten years ago tomorrow, on March 21, 2003, shortly.

The Iraq War began on March 19, 2003, when President Bush announced Operation Iraqi Freedom. The U.S. military and its coalition of allies launched a shock and awe campaign aimed at destroying the Iraqi government's will to fight. The campaign lasted until April and succeeded in decimating Saddam Hussein's military and government. But it was enormously destructive to civilians. Out of all. . Upload media Wikipedia: Instance of: aspect of history: Facet of: Iraq War, death toll: Authority control Q2389676. Reasonator PetScan Scholia Statistics Search depicted See also: Category:Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse Category:Refugees Category:Casualties of the Gulf War (1990-1991) Resources: Commons:Military-related image resources Archive of articles and many Iraq. The number of Iraqi casualties is not just a historical dispute, because the killing is still going on today. Since several major cities in Iraq and Syria fell to Islamic State in 2014, the U.S. The Iran-Iraq War (Persian: جنگ ایران و عراق ‎ Arabic: حرب الخليج الأولى ‎ First Gulf War) was a protracted armed conflict that began on 22 September 1980 when Iran was invaded by neighbouring Iraq.The war lasted almost eight years, ending in a stalemate on 20 August 1988 when Iran accepted a UN-brokered ceasefire.. Nearly half a million people have died from war-related causes in Iraq since the US-led invasion in 2003, according to an academic study published in the United States on Tuesday. That toll is far higher than the nearly 115,000 violent civilian deaths reported by the British-based group Iraq Body Count, which bases its tally on media reports, hospital and morgue records, and official and non.

In addition to unreported civilian casualties, the Iraq War Logs revealed multiple specific instances of war crimes, including the killing of Iraqis attempting to surrender, and human rights. Iraq Body Count (2003 - 14 December 2011): 103,160-113,728 civilian deaths recorded, and 12,438 new deaths added from the Iraq War Logs Associated Press (March 2003 - April 2009): 110,600. For more information see: Casualties of the Iraq War * injured, diseased, or other medical: required medical air transport. UK number includes. Estimates of the casualties from the conflict in Iraq since 2003 (beginning with the 2003 US invasion of Iraq, and the ensuing occupation and insurgency) have come in many forms, and the accuracy of the information available on different types of Iraq War casualties varies greatly.. Various scientific surveys of Iraqi deaths resulting from the first four years of the Iraq War estimated that. Casualties of the conflict in Iraq since 2003 (beginning with the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and continuing with the ensuing occupation of Iraq, as well as the activities of the various armed groups operating in the country) have come in many forms, and the accuracy of the information available on different types of Iraq War casualties varies greatly

. Source: Pentagon. March 21. Reported Iraqi casualties: British military claim six Iraqis were killed in battles to. Iraq War Casualties. Updated February 11, 2017 | Infoplease Staff. This page provides information about the number of U.S. troops in Iraq, including how many were killed, as well as Iraqi casualties. Estimated number of U.S. troops in Iraq at the end of 2011: 0: Number of casualties for 2011 : U.S. troops (through Dec. 31): 54: Iraqi civilians (through July 31): 977: Iraqi security forces.

ICasualties Iraq: iCasualties Home Pag

  1. Tens of thousands of civilians have been killed in sectarian violence in Iraq since the U.S.-led invasion in 2003. Here are some details on the casualties
  2. have not by themselves driven public attitudes toward the Iraq war, and mounting casualties have not always produced a reduction in public support. The Iraq case suggests that under the right conditions, the public will continue to support military operations even when they come with a relatively high hu-man cost. Our core argument is that the U.S. public's tolerance for the human costs of.
  3. Estimates of the Iraqi deaths caused by Saddam's regime amount to a maximum of one million over a 35-year period (100,000 Kurds in the Anfal campaign in the 1980s 400,000 in the war against Iran.
  4. This battle, known for its extensive casualties and ferocious conditions, was the biggest battle of the war and proved to be the beginning of the end of the Iran-Iraq War. [158] [159] While Iranian forces crossed the border and captured the eastern section of Basra Governorate, the operation ended in a stalemate

American soldiers killed in Iraq up to 2019 Statist

The inquiry into the UK's role in the Iraq War is publishing its findings. Here are the main events before, during and since the conflict U.S. Military Casualties - Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) Names of Fallen (As of May 22, 2015) Service Component Name (Last, First M) Rank Pay Grade Date of Death (yyyy/mm/dd) Age Gender Home of Record City Home of Record County Home of Record State Home of Record Country Unit Incident Geographic Code Casualty Geographic Code Casualty Country City of Loss MARINE CORPS ACTIVE DUTY ABAD, ROBERTO.

15 years after the Iraq War began, the death toll is still

  • Chilcot report: Who were the 179 British soldiers who died during the Iraq War? A full list of all the men and women that died, who they were, and what their loved ones have had to say about the
  • Estimates of the casualties from the conflict in Iraq (beginning with the 2003 US invasion of Iraq, and the ensuing occupation and insurgency) have come in many forms, and the accuracy of the information available on different types of Iraq War casualties varies greatly. 211 relations
  • CNN.com's 'Home and Away' initiative honors the lives of U.S. and coalition troops who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan. The extensive data visualization project tells the story of where and how.
  • A list of BBC episodes and clips related to Casualties of the Iraq War
  • USA Casualties of the Iraq War From 2003 to july 17, 2009 Associated Press count (August 9, 2008): 4,136 members of the U.S. military.The AP count is one few..

Iraq Body Coun

Iraq War Casualties (Sources) These graphs do not show all fatalities, but only those killed in hostile action. This makes it a better indicator of the intensity of conflict than can be found elsewhere. Hostile fatalities in the fifth year were 678, which is 20% below the highest (851), in year four. There is no discernible continuing downward trend within the fifth year. Rumsfeld expected. 2003 Iraq War Casualties: Death toll. While estimates on the number of casualties during the invasion in Iraq vary widely, the majority of deaths and injuries have occurred after U.S. President Bush declared the end of major combat operations on May 1, 2003. According to CNN, the U.S. government reported that 139 American military personnel were killed before May 1, 2003, while over 4,000.

A tally of Iraq casualties in war and death camps from 1980-2009, under Saddam Hussein's regime to George W. Bush's war Today news from war on Daesh, ISIS in English from Somalia, Egypt, Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria - isis.liveuamap.com. Map. History of ISIS conflict. source On live map. Tell friends. Liveuamap News. Jump to map . Watch more. Afghanistan Looks like Taliban documented the SVBIED attack in Gardez, Paktia. California Last night, fire spread to superstructure aboard amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme.

Video: Iraq War Summary, Causes, Combatants, Casualties

I conduct six experiments, three on the Iraq War (two with national, representative samples) and three with a new type of panel experiment design on hypothetical military interventions. The results of hazard and ordered logit analyses of almost 3,000 subjects support a rational expectations theory linking recent casualties, casualty trends, and their interaction to wartime approval. I also. Significant civilian casualties occurred in the air war in Iraq despite the use of a high percentage of precision weapons. Of the 29,199 bombs dropped during the war by the United States and. . Contractor Casualties. Their status as civilian is controversial. They are employees of U.S. government contractors and subcontractors, private military contractors, U.S. Department of Defense, etc. The contractors come from many nations including Iraq and the U.S. A July 4, 2007, Los Angeles Times article reports: More than 180,000. civilian and other casualties in the 2003 Iraq war • Accounts of individual incidents of civilian fatalities resulting from combat operations • Accounts pertaining to public health and hospital conditions during the war and after. The compendium is meant to serve as a database for further investigation of the modes and dynamics of conflict that generate non-combatant casualties. The.

United States military casualties of war - Wikipedi

  1. Top News Videos for iran-iraq war casualties. 00:31. Rocket Attack on Green Zone Kills Child, Injures 5 Others. Newsy via Yahoo News · 2 days ago. Trending. Top Searches Holiday Gifts. 1 Kelly Oubre 2 Hugo Chavez 3 CA Curfew 4 Rachel Maddow Covid 5 Toyota Tacoma Sale 6 Klay Thompson 7 Window Blinds 8 Laptop Computer Online 9 Nancy Pelosi 10 Bobby Brown Son Top Searches Holiday Gifts.
  2. Iraq War Casualties. Texas Fallen Heroes: Clinton Ross Gertson: Christopher Reed Kilpatrick: If you have photographs or additional information you would like to contribute, please contact the volunteer county coordinator. Eagle Lake man killed in Iraq Clinton Ross Gertson January 30, 1979 - February 19, 2005. By James Jennings, Managing Editor. Spec. Clint Gertson, 26, of Eagle Lake was killed.
  3. Iraq War Pennsylvania Casualties. Date post: 29-Nov-2014: Category: Documents: View: 344 times: Download: 2 times: Download for free Report this document. Share this document with a friend. Transcript: The following are the men and women from Pennsylvania or with ties to Pennsylvania who have died while serving in Iraq or in support of the Iraq War: 2003March 23, 2003 Capt. Christopher Scott.
  4. * * Iraq: 10 Years After, 19 March 2013 - Costs of War * * CNN Map U.S. and Coalition Iraq/Afghanistan Casualties. Civilian Fatalities in Afghanistan, 2001-2012 * Bookshelf * Iraq War Inquiry * The Torture Archive * Donate * Subscribe * Tuesday, May 31, 2011.
  5. Iran acknowledged that nearly 300,000 people died in the war estimates of the Iraqi dead range from 160,000 to 240,000. Iraq suffered an estimated 375,000 casualties, the equivalent of 5.6.
  6. Iraq War and Female Casualties. James Joyner · Monday, May 15, 2006 · 5 comments. Female troops are getting killed and wounded in Iraq in unprecedented numbers, reports the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Vietnam War prior to 1964-US Casualties were Laos-2 killed in 1954 and Vietnam 1946-1954 2 killed see f. ^ Iraq War. See also Casualties of the conflict in Iraq since 2003. Sources: . g. ^ Afghanistan. Casualties include those that occurred in Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guantanamo Bay (Cuba), Jordan, Kenya. And the war in Iraq is less than one year old. A recent piece by Daniel Zwerdling on National Public Radio (January 7) highlighted some of the difficulties in establishing the truth about US. american iraq war casualties names: 12. Next 19 results. Top News Videos for american iraq war casualties. 01:40. U.S. lawmakers react to Iran missile strike. R Videos via Yahoo News · 10 months ago. 02:20. Trump says Iran 'appears to be standing down' Yahoo News · 10 months ago . 02:15. Iran retaliates with 'slap in the face' missile strike on U.S. troops Yahoo News · 10 months ago. American War and Military Operations Casualties: Lists and Statistics Congressional Research Service 3 Casualties War or Conflict Branch of Service Number Serving Total Deaths Battle Deaths Other Deaths Wounds Not Mortala Marines 794,000 14,844 13,095 1,749 Hosp. Care: 51,392 No Hosp. Care: 37,202 Air Force 1,740,000 2,586 1,745 84 More than one million Iraqis have died as a result of the conflict in their country since the U.S.-led invasion in 2003, according to research conducted by one of Britain's leading polling groups

Iraqi War Casualties : Person Person : [email protected]: 2009-12-10 It seems you only post the most violent reactions to your blog in the feedback section thereby elevating your stature as a martyr. People don't usually get up the energy to write unless they are angry. What you see posted is a pretty random sample. I don't post the most obscene emails because Google would. An Iraqi man comforts his 4-year-old son at a regroupment center for POWs of the 101st Airborne Division near An Najaf, Iraq Monday, March 31, 2003. The man was seized in An Najaf with his son and. No casualties reported: US and Iraqi sources said there were no known casualties. Iraq said it was warned about the attack in advance, and that warning was reportedly passed to the US

Iran-Iraq War Causes, Summary, Casualties, & Facts

Comprehensive details of British servicemen and women killed in Iraq between the invasion of 20 March 2003 and withdrawal in 2009 If Iran's defense strategy works, a U.S. attack on Iran ― unlike Iraq ― will draw an immediate response throughout the region, leading to thousands of U.S. casualties in the earliest stages of the war. The Iranian calculation is that U.S. sensitivity to casualties will quickly push the American public against the war ― which likely wouldn't be popular to begin with ― presenting the. Capturing one of the most shocking 'battles' of the Iraq War, Geoff Thompson's diary reaches an explosive conclusion - a car speeds up behind our convoy and jittery marines open fire as it. An extensive study of the war in Iraq undertaken shortly after official combat operations ceased. From the U.S. Army's Office of the Chief of Staff. Operation Iraqi Freedom: Casualties The Defense Casualty Analysis System provides data regarding casualties incurred during the war in Iraq. Information is available by demographics, by casualty category, by month, and by names of the fallen. The war against Iraq in 1990-91 saw the largest single deployment of British troops since the Second World War. Altogether, about 35,000 British servicemen and women served in the campaign

Casualties in Iraq - Antiwar

  1. A study released Thursday says the U.S.-led war on terrorism has killed about 507,000 people in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan during its 17 years and is showing a 22 percent increase in deaths in.
  2. War-related casualty numbers are generally not precise, particularly when a conflict is ongoing, when civilians and combatants may not be easily distinguished, and when insecurity limits access to large parts of the countries in question. The difficulties associated with counting war-related casualties in Syria and Iraq can be grouped into broa
  3. Casualties of War. There were an estimated 1.5 million casualties reported during the Civil War. A casualty is a military person lost through death, wounds, injury, sickness, internment, capture, or through being missing in action. Casualty and fatality are not interchangeable terms--death is only one of the ways that a soldier can become a casualty. In practice, officers would usually.
  4. Iraq, on the other hand, U.S. casualties continued to mount at the same rate as during the occupation, but presidential approval oscillated at about 50 percent despite the mounting death toll

U.S. Casualties in Iraq

Further, Iran is a key partner of Syrian President Bashar Assad in the country's civil war and has dispatched military advisers and allied militias to help his forces. Golan Heights was seized by Israel from Syria in the 1967 war and later attached it in a move not recognized internationally Casualties of the conflict in Iraq since 2003 (beginning with the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and continuing with the ensuing occupation of Iraq, as well as the activities of the various armed groups operating in the country) have come in many forms, and the accuracy of the information available on different types of Iraq War casualties varies greatly.. Estimates of the casualties from the conflict in Iraq since 2003 (beginning with the 2003 US invasion of Iraq, and the ensuing occupation and insurgency) have come in many forms, and the accuracy of the information available on different types of Iraq War casualties varies greatly. Various scientific surveys of Iraqi deaths resulting from the first four years of the Iraq War estimated that. On Thursday, The New York Times Magazine published a blockbuster investigative report by Azmat Khan and Anand Gopal documenting civilian casualties caused by coalition airstrikes in the war against ISIS in Iraq. Beginning in the spring of 2016, Khan and Gopal began visiting the sites of coalition strikes that had taken place since the war began in 2014, as well as interviewing survivors.

Honor The Fallen - Home Page Military Time

Posts about Iraq War Casualties written by thebokononist and blueneck. Everybody Comes From Somewhere. February 11, 2007. The Iraq Debacle Week in Review. Filed under: Iraq War Casualties — thebokononist @ 3:05 pm . Saturday (Feb. 10): 87 Iraqis Killed, 3 GIs 41 Iraqis, 4 GIs Wounded. Friday (Feb 9): 35 Iraqis, 3 GIs, 1 Briton Killed 54 Iraqis Wounded. Thursday (Feb 8): 212 Iraqis, 4. Archive for the 'Iraq war casualties' Category. Drugged and Dangerous. Posted by terres on May 21, 2009. U.S. Military: Heavily Armed and Medicated Prescription pill dependency among American troops is on the rise. By Melody Petersen. Marine Corporal Michael Cataldi woke as he heard the truck rumble past. He opened his eyes, but saw nothing. It was the middle of the night, and he was. See also Casualties of the Iraq War, which has casualty numbers for coalition nations, contractors, non-Iraqi civilians, journalists, media helpers, aid workers, and the wounded. Casualty figures, especially Iraqi ones, are highly disputed. There have been several attempts by the media, coalition governments and others to estimate the Iraqi casualties. The table below summarizes some of these.

OPERATION IRAQI FREEDOM U.S. CASUALTY STATUS1 Total Deaths KIA Non-Hostile Pending WIA OIF U.S. Military Casualties 4,418 3,481 937 0 31,994 OIF U.S. DOD Civilian Casualties 13 9 4 0 Totals 4,431. Operation Iraqi Freedom Operation New Dawn Operation Octave Shield Operation Odyssey Lightning Operation Spartan Shield U.S. Africa Command Operations U.S. Central Command operations The People Behind The Sacrifice Search Our Database. First Name Last Name Date Range Conflict. Home State. Home Town. View By Year & Month. 2020 January February March April May June July August September. The Iraq war from its inception was domestically and internationally unpopular especially as it went specifically against the will of the United Nations regarding pre-emptive war on the grounds of so called WMDs.The first casualty of war is always the truth.The war itself was instigated by the Neoconservatives in the U.S and it is they who control the Pentagon and military administration,Mr.

Trends in Iraqi Violence, Casualties and Impact of War: 2003-2015. September 14, 2015. The focus on the threat posed by ISIS has led to a dangerous tendency to ignore the overall patterns of violence in Iraq and the fact that any lasting peace and stability must address Iraq's other causes of violence Iraq War Casualties. Service: Comp: Name: Rank: Dateof Death: Hostile: Age: Sex: Home of Record City: Home ofRecord County: Unit: CasualtyCountry: City of Loss: Race/ Ethnic: M R ALLEN TERRENCE PATRICK CPL 20070915 21 M PENNSAUKEN CAMDEN WPNS CO, 1ST BN, 2D MAR, 2D MAR DIV, CAMP LEJEUNE, NC IRAQ AL ASAD WHITE A R ANEIROS YOE MANUEL SPC 20040907 H 20 M NEWARK ESSEX C COMPANY, 2D BATTALION, 70TH. The casualties of this war are numerous: life, security and liberty -in Iraq, in the Middle East and, to a small extent, in western countries. As to the winners of this war, they are the. List of casualties in Iraq war. April 11, 2003 — 10.00am. Normal text size Larger text size Very large text size. Following are details of recent casualties in the Iraq war as announced by US.


United States military casualty statistics: operation Iraqi freedom and operation enduring freedom.

This report presents difficult-to-find statistics regarding U.S. military casualties in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF, Afghanistan), including those concerning medical evacuations, amputations, and the demographics of casualties. Some of these statistics are publically available at the Department of Defense's (DOD's) website, while others have been obtained through contact with experts at DOD.

Daily updates of total U.S. military casualties in OIF and OEF can be found at the DOD's website, at [http://www.dior.whs.mil/mmid/casualty/castop.htm]. In addition, the CRS Report RS21578, Iraq: Summary of U.S. Casualties is updated on a weekly basis.

This report will be updated as needed.

Medical Evacuation Statistics--U.S. Military Personnel

All U.S. military personnel evacuation statistics are provided to CRS by DOD's Deployment Health Support Directorate (DHSD) and the Army Office of the Surgeon General. The numbers listed in this report are taken from DOD's May 18, 2006 March 7, 2006 July 14, 2005, February 8, 2005 and October 18, 2004 updates. All numbers have been generated using the Transportation Command (TRANSCOM) Regulation and Command and Control Evacuation System (TRAC2ES).

Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)

According to DOD, a total of 26,802 individuals were medically evacuated from OIF from March 19, 2003, to May 18, 2006.

Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF)

According to DOD, a total of 4,619 individuals were medically evacuated from OEF between October 27, 2001 through February 27, 2006.

Amputation and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Statistics for American Forces

Amputation and TBI statistics are provided to CRS by the Army Office of the Surgeon General. These injuries may overlap, that is, a single soldier may experience both a TBI and an amputation. The Army has subdivided its numbers to show this possible overlap according to their statistics in March 2006, of the total 1,124 Army soldiers injured in the Global War on Terrorism (or GWOT, which includes OIF, OEF and some additional contingencies that do not contribute large numbers), 895 (or 80%) sustained a single injury, while 229 (or 20%) sustained multiple injuries.

Keeping these possible overlaps in mind, as of May 3, 2006, DOD reported a total of 674 amputations during OIF and OEF. Of the total number of amputations, 575 were sustained in OIF, 41 were sustained in OEF, and 58 were sustained during non-deployment. Of all amputations, 42.1% were caused by improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

As of March 31, 2006, DOD reported a total of 1,179 traumatic brain injuries, or TBIs, during OIF and OEF. Of those TBIs, 96% or 1,128, were sustained during OIF, while 4%, or 50, were sustained during OEF. Of the total injuries in OIF and OEF, 222 were counted as "severe" or "penetrating."

Gender Distribution of Deaths

Statistics in Tables 6 and 7 concerning the gender distribution of OIF and OEF casualties are available on DOD's military casualty information website. All numbers are current as of April 29, 2006.

Race/Ethnicity Distribution of Deaths

Statistics in Tables 8 and 9 concerning the race and ethnicity distribution of OIF and OEF casualties are available on DOD's military casualty information website. All numbers are current as of April 29, 2006. Percentages may not total 100 due to rounding.


Tax Cuts, the Deficit, and Recovery

On the domestic front, President Bush unveiled a sweeping economic stimulus plan that characteristically centered around tax cuts. The plan in its original form was to cut taxes by $670 billion over ten years Congress approved a $350 billion version in May (which will in fact rise to a $800 billion tax cut if its sunset clauses are cancelled). The plan strongly favored two groups: two-parent households with several children, and the wealthy?nearly half the proposed tax benefits were reserved for the richest 10% of American taxpayers. Critics argued that it was unsound to offer tax cuts in the midst of a jobless recovery (nearly 3 million jobs had been lost since Bush came to office), when the country was involved in an enormously expensive war, and when the federal budget deficit, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, was expected to reach a record $480 billion in 2004. Bush continued to argue that his previous tax cuts (this was his third round) had managed to keep the recession shallow and were beginning to revive the economy. And indeed, the economy began to rebound substantially in the latter part of 2003. GDP grew by a vigorous 7.2% in the third quarter, and in the fourth quarter, unemployment began to drop as productivity increased.

But prospects remained bleak for the poor: the most recent statistics revealed that in 2002, 34.6 million (12% of the population) lived in poverty, up 1.7 million from the year 2001, and the percent of the population without health insurance rose to 15.2%, the largest increase in a decade.


U.S. casualties from Iraq war top 9,000

WASHINGTON, Nov. 14 (UPI) -- The number of U.S. casualties from Operation Iraqi Freedom -- troops killed, wounded or evacuated due to injury or illness -- has passed 9,000, according to new Pentagon data.

In addition to the 397 service members who have died and the 1,967 wounded, 6,861 troops were medically evacuated for non-combat conditions between March 19 and Oct. 30, the Army Surgeon General's office said.

That brings total casualties among all services to more than 9,200, and represents an increase of nearly 3,000 non-combat medical evacuations reported since the first week of October. The Army offered no immediate explanation for the increase.

A leading veterans' advocate expressed concern.

"We are shocked at the dramatic increase in casualties," said Steve Robinson, executive director of the National Gulf War Resource Center.

Of the non-combat medical evacuations:

-- 2,464 were for injuries, such as those sustained in vehicle accidents.

-- 4,397 were due to illness 504 of those were classified as psychiatric, 378 as neurological, and another 150 as neurosurgery.

"We are especially concerned about the psychological and neurological evacuations from this war," Robinson said. "We request a clarification of the types of illnesses people are suffering from so we do not have a repeat of the first Gulf War. We need to understand the nature and types of illnesses so scientists can determine if significant trends are occurring."

Army Surgeon General's Office spokeswoman Virginia Stephanakis told United Press International Thursday that it is misleading to combine psychiatric and neurological problems. Some of the neurosurgery might be operations on the spinal cord, for example.

"Those are apples and oranges," she said.

She also said that some troops evacuated for psychiatric reasons later returned after getting a rest.

In early October, the Army Surgeon General's office said 3,915 soldiers had been evacuated from Operation Iraqi Freedom for non-combat injuries and illnesses, including 478 with psychological problems and 387 for neurological reasons.

The new total of 6,861 reported non-combat evacuations is a rise of 57 percent since then.

The latest data on non-combat evacuations includes 1,628 orthopedic (bone) injuries. Other leading causes for evacuations include:

-- 831 surgeries for injuries

Stephanakis said the pulmonary problems included soldiers who suffered from pneumonia as part of a cluster investigated by the Army in August.

The numbers don't include service members treated in theater or those whose illnesses -- such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder -- were not apparent until after they returned to the United States.


Military Operations

The following is from the Defense Casualty Analysis System. Military operations are linked to their casualty statistics page.

Operation Freedom’s Sentinel (OFS)

Following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the United States executed Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) in Afghanistan, targeting al Qaeda leadership and infrastructure supported by the Afghan Taliban regime. U.S. forces contributed to a coalition of up to 50 Allied and partner countries as part of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) to secure the country and develop Afghan security forces.

U.S. combat operations in Afghanistan ended on December 31, 2014. As part of Operation FREEDOM’S SENTINEL (OFS), U.S. forces remain in the country to participate in a coalition mission to train, advise, and assist Afghan National Defense and Security Forces and to conduct counterterrorism operations against the remnants of al Qaeda.

Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR)

Combined Joint Task Force – Operation INHERENT RESOLVE (CJTF-OIR) is comprised of U.S. military and coalition forces. The CJTF-OIR is united to build the military coalition to support Iraqi Security Force operations against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). Kinetic operations started on Aug. 8, 2014.

Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF)

In response to the September 2001 terrorist attacks on New York’s World Trade Center and the Pentagon, President George W. Bush launched the Global War on Terror (GWOT). As it evolved, his objective was two-fold: to destroy al Qaeda, the Taliban, and other terrorist groups in Afghanistan and around the world, and to remove Saddam Hussein from power to forestall threats from his presumed possession of weapons of mass destruction (WMD).

Operation ENDURING FREEDOM began on October 7, 2001, when the United States launched military operations in Afghanistan, including airstrikes against Kabul and Kandahar. In sustaining military operations for over a decade, American troops continue to fight a widespread insurgency and establish a viable government. On May 1, 2011, US Navy SEALS killed al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in Pakistan.

U.S. combat operations in Afghanistan ended on December 31, 2014.

Operation New Dawn (OND)

Over the course of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), a broad insurgency ebbed and flowed, challenging efforts to create a democratic Iraqi government and threatening open sectarian warfare between minority Sunni and majority Shia, with northern Kurds aspiring to regional autonomy amid the unrest.

In January 2007, United States military forces in Iraq implemented the surge, a counterinsurgency strategy devised by General David Petraeus. U.S. combat operations ended on September 1, 2010. American troops remained in the country to advise Iraqi security forces as part of Operation NEW DAWN until the final withdrawal on December 15, 2011.

Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)

Simultaneous to the war in Afghanistan, the United States and its allies threatened military action if Iraq did not abide by all of the numerous UN resolutions of the past ten years, including UN Security Council Resolution 1441 (2002), which called on Iraq to cooperate unconditionally with UN weapons inspectors to verify that Iraq was not in possession of WMD and ballistic missiles. The United Nations Monitoring, Verification, and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) found no evidence of WMD, but could not verify the accuracy of Iraq’s weapons declarations.

On March 20, 2003, in the face of Iraq’s resistance to open inspections by UN weapons inspectors, the U.S. and coalition forces launched Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, a combined air and ground assault. U.S. troops seized Baghdad after just twenty-one days. A broad insurgency that ebbed and flowed over the next seven years challenged efforts to create a democratic Iraqi government and threatened open sectarian warfare between minority Sunni and majority Shia, with northern Kurds aspiring to regional autonomy amid the unrest.

On May 1st, 2003, U.S. President George W. Bush declared the end to major combat operations in Iraq.

Overseas Contingency Operations (OEF, OIF, OND, OIR & OFS Combined)

In response to the September 2001 terrorist attacks on New York’s World Trade Center and the Pentagon, President George W. Bush launched the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO), formally the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). As it evolved, his objective was two-fold: to destroy al Qaeda, the Taliban, and other terrorist groups in Afghanistan and around the world, and to remove Saddam Hussein from power to forestall threats from his presumed possession of weapons of mass destruction. Operation ENDURING FREEDOM began on October 7, 2001, when the United States launched military operations in Afghanistan, including airstrikes against Kabul and Kandahar. In sustaining military operations for over a decade, American troops continue to fight a widespread insurgency and establish a viable government. On May 1, 2011, US Navy SEALS killed al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. Simultaneous to the war in Afghanistan, the United States and its allies threatened military action if Iraq did not abide by all of the numerous UN resolutions of the past ten years, including UN Security Council Resolution 1441 (2002), which called on Iraq to cooperate unconditionally with UN weapons inspectors to verify that Iraq was not in possession of WMD and ballistic missiles. The United Nations Monitoring, Verification, and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) found no evidence of WMD, but could not verify the accuracy of Iraq’s weapons declarations. In the face of Iraq’s resistance to open inspections, U.S. and coalition forces on March 20, 2003, launched Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, a combined air and ground assault. U.S. troops seized Baghdad after just twenty-one days. A broad insurgency that ebbed and flowed over the next seven years challenged efforts to create a democratic Iraqi government and threatened open sectarian warfare between minority Sunni and majority Shia, with northern Kurds aspiring to regional autonomy amid the unrest. In January 2007, U.S. military forces implemented “the surge”, a counterinsurgency strategy devised by General David Petraeus. U.S. combat operations ended on September 1, 2010. American troops remained in the country to advise Iraqi security forces as part of Operation NEW DAWN until the final withdrawal on December 15, 2011.

Combined Joint Task Force – Operation INHERENT RESOLVE (CJTF-OIR) is comprised of U.S. military and coalition forces. The CJTF-OIR is united to build the military coalition to support Iraqi Security Force operations against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). Kinetic operations started on Aug. 8, 2014.

Following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the United States executed Operation ENDURING FREEDOM (OEF) in Afghanistan, targeting al Qaeda leadership and infrastructure supported by the Afghan Taliban regime. U.S. forces contributed to a coalition of up to 50 Allied and partner countries as part of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) to secure the country and develop Afghan security forces. U.S. combat operations in Afghanistan ended on December 31, 2014. As part of Operation FREEDOM’S SENTINEL (OFS), U.S. forces remain in the country to participate in a coalition mission to train, advise, and assist Afghan National Defense and Security Forces and to conduct counterterrorism operations against the remnants of al Qaeda.

Persian Gulf War

The Persian Gulf War began on August 2, 1990, when approximately 100,000 Iraqi Army troops crossed the Kuwaiti border. The United Nations Security Council swiftly condemned Iraq, passing Resolution 660 demanding an immediate and unconditional withdrawal of Iraqi forces from Kuwait. After consulting with Saudi King Fahd, on August 6, 1990, President George H.W. Bush ordered the deployment of U.S. ground, air, and naval forces to the Arabian Peninsula. Named DESERT SHIELD, the initial phases of operations focused on deterring an invasion of Saudi Arabia and preparing to liberate Kuwait. Saddam Hussein’s failure to comply with UN Security Council Resolution 678 of November 1990, which set January 15, 1991, as the deadline for Iraqi withdrawal from Kuwait, provided the impetus for the next phase of the campaign. The offensive war, Operation DESERT STORM, began on January 17, 1991, with air operations against Iraqi forces in Kuwait and selected targets inside Iraq. On February 28, 1991, a mere 100 hours after the coalition launched its ground offensive, U.S. Central Command liberated Kuwait and halted offensive operations. With the approval of the UN Security Council, a formal cease-fire took effect on April 11, thus ending the Persian Gulf War.

Vietnam War

After eight years of warfare between the French and the communist-led Viet Minh, the 1954 Geneva Agreements ended France’s colonial rule and partitioned Vietnam into a communist-controlled North and a non-communist South backed by the United States. In the South, beginning in 1957, communist Viet Cong waged a guerrilla campaign against the regime of Ngo Dinh Diem and drew increasing support from the North. The United States tried to bolster Diem’s government with increasing numbers of advisers and material aid. In 1963, as the insurgency appeared to gain strength, South Vietnamese military officers overthrew Diem but the situation only worsened. In August 1964, following a North Vietnamese naval attack on a U.S. warship, the U.S. Congress approved the Tonkin Gulf Resolution (P.L. 88-408), authorizing President Johnson to expand conventional military operations in Vietnam without a formal declaration of war. During 1965, to prevent the imminent collapse of South Vietnam, the United States launched Rolling Thunder, a systematic bombing campaign against the North, and started committing ground combat forces in the South. The purpose of Rolling Thunder, never achieved, was to compel the North to stop helping the Viet Cong. By April 1969, despite U.S. military personnel in the South peaking at 543,400, victory remained elusive and more of the American public began to turn against the war. Rolling Thunder was suspended and in 1969 U.S. troop withdrawals began. Between 1970 and 1972, bombing of the North resumed intermittently and sometimes intensively but ground redeployments continued and the bulk of U.S. forces left the South. The Paris Peace Accords, signed on January 27, 1973, proved to be a temporary truce rather than a genuine peace. In the wake of North Vietnam’s multiple assaults, South Vietnam collapsed in the spring of 1975. As North Vietnam took over, President Gerald R. Ford declared the Vietnam War over.

Korean War

The Korean War began on June 25, 1950, when North Korea (officially the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) launched a surprise attack on neighboring South Korea (officially the Republic of Korea). Against the expectations of the North Koreans and the Soviet Union, the United States immediately provided military support to South Korea, and the UN Security Council passed a resolution (UNSC Resolution 82) demanding a North Korean withdrawal to the 38th Parallel. Within days of the initial assault, UN forces under the leadership of General Douglas MacArthur began planning a large-scale counterassault, culminating in the Battle of Inchon in September 1950. In the months following the invasion at Inchon, UN troops forced the North Korean Army to retreat, capturing the capital of Pyongyang and reaching North Korea’s northernmost border at the Yalu River. With secret backing from Moscow, in October and November 1950 hundreds of thousands of Chinese troops moved into North Korea and forced the South Korean and UN troops to retreat. By the summer of 1951, the conflict on the ground stalemated. While aerial bombing of North Korea and localized battles and skirmishes continued, the two sides exchanged little territory over the next two years. The conflict ended with the signing of an armistice on July 27, 1953. It preserved the prewar geographic division of Korea, keeping North Korean and South Korean troops on active alert on opposite sides of the Military Demarcation Line.

World War II

World War II was the largest and most violent military conflict in human history. Official casualty sources estimate battle deaths at nearly 15 million military personnel and civilian deaths at over 38 million. Fought largely between two opposing military alliances, the Allies and the Axis, the war engulfed Europe, North Africa, much of Asia and the world’s oceans. Germany, Japan, and Italy led the loosely cooperating Axis nations. The major Allies were the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union, although a great many other nations committed forces.

The worldwide struggle officially began with the German attack on Poland on September 1, 1939, followed quickly by Great Britain, its Commonwealth dominions, and France declaring war on Germany. With the defeat of France in 1940, Great Britain fought off a German air campaign and escaped invasion. The German invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941 brought that nation into the war and opened a major new theater. In Asia, the Japanese had been fighting to take over China since 1931. A surprise Japanese attack on the American fleet at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii in December 1941 brought the United States into the war on the side of the Allies and opened a 45-month struggle in the Pacific and Indian Oceans and Asia. The American and British-led invasions of North Africa and then Italy, along with Soviet successes, turned the tide against the Axis in Europe. The Allied landings in Normandy in June 1944 opened a western front and, coupled with continued Soviet offensives in the east, brought about the eventual defeat and unconditional surrender of Germany in May 1945. The war culminated with the United States dropping atomic bombs on two Japanese cities and the unconditional surrender of Japan on 2 September 1945.

World War I

On 28 June 1914, in Sarajevo, a Serb nationalist assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne. Due to a network of competing alliances, a European history of nationalistic rivalry over colonies and military dominance, and the importance of being the first to mobilize reserve forces for war, this small event initiated what was then the largest conflict the world had ever experienced. The Austro-Hungarians, allied with Germany, made demands on Serbia, backed by Russia, which was in turn allied with France. Great Britain supported Russia and France in what was known as the Triple Entente. In the event of war with Russia and France, the German Schlieffen Plan envisioned a quick victory over France, which necessitated violation of the neutrality of Belgium, so that it could then turn all its attention to Russia, which would mobilize much more slowly. Within one week of Austro-Hungary’s 28 July declaration of war on Serbia, most of Europe was embroiled. Japan, an ally of Great Britain, joined in on 23 August, thus extending the conflict to the Pacific. The Ottoman Empire also would come in on the side of Germany and extend the war into the Middle East, while Italy would side with Triple Entente in 1915. By the time the Great War (as it was known prior to World War II) ended in 1918, more than nine million soldiers and a further five million civilians had died.

The initial German advance through Belgium and into France was successful, but ultimately ran out of steam short of Paris in the face of stiffening French and British resistance. As each side tried to outflank the other, a series of opposing defensive trenches soon stretched from the English Channel to Switzerland. Coupled with machine guns, barbed wire, and modern artillery, the fortified lines led to a static battle of attrition on this front. The introduction of chemical weapons and the tank brought short-term advantages but no significant change in the front lines. The battle lines were not as static in the East, but neither side could gain the upper hand over the other.


Contents

Raw data or data for analysis ("Coalition" military data)

  • US soldiersU.S. Central Command in the Gulf. As soon as a fatality occurs, a very basic notification is made available on this official US-military website. Caveat: This listing is not complete, and it often leaves out some fatalities -- even some due to hostile causes. Further confusion is added because on a few occasions the fatality notification appeared in a release whose title had nothing to do with the incident leading to the death of a soldier, i.e., usually the heading indicates the nature of the press release, but this is not 100% the case. There are frequent errors, and if one cross checks with DefenseLink, Reuters, or AP, one finds errors in the number of soldiers killed and the dates of the event. NB: This website seldom announces fatalities due to "non-hostile" causes. Soldiers dying from accidents, heatstroke, suicide, etc., are usually only found in DefenseLink. Although very few obvious errors have been corrected in the past, for the past few month no corrections have been issued. Website reports on US military casualties exclusively, and it is updated daily (with delays when military action intensifies).
  • US soldiersUS Department of Defense News Releases. A few days after the fatality has been announced by CentCom, there is a confirmation including the name and age of the soldier on this website. Again, the same problems found with CentCom are found here. However, "non-hostile" fatalities are usually only found on this webiste. While CentCom mentions instances of wounded personnel (and then only if in the same incident there have been fatalities), DefenseLink does not mention them. Although a few obvious errors have been corrected in the past, for the past few month no corrections have been issued. NB: There are quite a few errors in the announcements and sometimes it is not possible to reach the older records — a problem that seems to have been rectified recently, but it is not clear if the complete archive is available. Website reports on US military casualties exclusively, and it is updated daily.
  • British soldiersMOD: Operation Telic This is the British Ministry of Defense website, and it is very good quality. Note the fact that the notices given for the fatalities contain a tribute to the soldiers and express regret. This stands in stark contrast with the US military notifications that are cold renderings of some statistic. This website reports on British military casualties exclusively, and it is updated daily.
  • All "Coalition" soldiersIraq Coalition Casualty Count (formerly known as LunaVille) Website tallies all military fatalities, and attempts to track the following: "contractor" fatalities, military injuries. A very good quality data source including most “coalition” fatalities. It has an excellent quality running news column — updated regularly. Some graphics and tables are available on the website. Downside: some of the time periods available for analysis are odd. However, this is a valuable website — the best website where one can obtain data for analysis and not for "remembrance". Note that this database removes CentCom announced fatalities if DefenseLink doesn't confirm them.
  • US soldiersGlobal Security Compiles data on US fatalities, and attempts to find contradictions or deliberate gaps by referring to official data. Important resource.
  • US-UK soldiers Paul de Rooij, The Military Death Toll While Enforcing the Occupation of Iraq: A Weekly Data Sheet of US-uk Military Fatalities Post-May 1, 2003, updated weekly, DissidentVoice.org. Contains a graph giving an overview of US-uk fatalities, a fatality forecast, monthly fatality averages, race/sex and age composition of fatalities, list of related articles, list of data resources, and a tally of the number of times prez Bush has visited soldiers in hospital or attended a funeral. The datasheet is meant to put into perspective the Pentagon reported numbers, and to highlight the creeping mendacity in their reporting.
  • US soldiersGraph: U.S. Military Deaths in the Conquest of Iraq. This is a simple graph of cumulative fatalities vs. time. It only uses official data for military fatalities, and therefore excludes other "coalition" fatalities, contractors, etc. It doesn't separate the "hot war" period from the occupation phase. Limited usefulness.
  • mostly US soldiers, some otherCasualties in Iraq, AntiWar.com. Simple tabulations of fatalities and links to other data sources.
  • OverallBasic Statistical overview. Friends Services. Basic overview of stats of the US-Iraq war, and focuses on US fatalities.
  • US soldiersCalendar of US Military Dead during Iraq War, Cryptome. Includes month-by-month tally of the numbers of deaths and the "Names of the Dead and How They Died."

Remembrance websites

There are hundreds of remembrance websites in the U.S., and nearly every newspaper maintains one. Several right-wing groups also maintain extensive lists with special effects and so forth. Note however the limited usefulness of these websites. They only carry photos, basic bio data of the person, and the date of death. Nothing else. For research purposes most of these websites are useless.

  • US militaryFaces of Valor, Army Times. Announcement of US fatalities in Iraq or Afghanistan, basic bio-info, some photos. No analysis.
  • US militaryFallen Warriors: Operation Iraqi Freedom, DefendAmerica.mil. Listing of soldiers by name, unit and "operation" (Iraq or Afghanistan). Source: official military website.
  • US-UK militaryIraq War Online Memorial. Some portraits of fatalities, many photos missing, yet another tacky website (turn off sound).
  • US militaryhonored by Gary Trudeau, Doonesbury. Single cartoon dealing with the list of US fatalities.
  • US militaryFatality List, Houston Chronicle, basic searchable database dealing exclusively with US fatalities in Iraq.
  • US militaryFatality List, USNewsLink, basic list of the names of fatalities per day.
  • US militaryFatality list, TulsaWorld.com using AP data. Very basic list of fatalities (yet another one).
  • "Coalition" militaryFatalities List, CNN, basic list of fatalities with (age, photo, hometown, cause of death, date of death, unit) Can be arranged by date or by name. No other analysis avaialable.

Remembrance websites down the memory hole

The initial patriotic fervor that the newspapers rode by publishing extensive lists of the fallen soldiers has been abandoned by several news organizations. Maybe these lists are having a detrimental effect on the public's appetite for this war, and it also brings forth a realization that the cost is likely to be very high for the forseable future.

  • US militaryFatalities List Baltimore Sun, basic listing of names/photo/unit/date of fatality/circumstances. Stopped updating in February 2005.
  • Seattle Times, stopped updating in March 2004.

Veterans Groups sites

Analysis of data, interpretation, propaganda discussion

  • Maureen Fan, Soldiers' remains recorded before heading home, Knight Ridder, November 24, 2003: "The task is fairly straightforward. Permanent identification, embalming and dressing of the body take place stateside. But the job takes its toll. There's a soldier to process every day."
  • Brad Knickerbocker, Iraq War's Human Toll Could Be Felt for Decades. Beyond fatalities, an average of eight American soldiers a day are wounded, Christian Science Monitor, October 1, 2003.
  • Paul de Rooij, The Parade of the Body Bags: Changing Numbers and Colors of the Dead, CounterPunch, Aug. 9, 2003. Contains a discussion of how the fatality statistics are being obfuscated, and how the propagandists are likely to erase further references to US fatalities.
  • Paul de Rooij, For Whom The Death Tolls: Deliberate Undercounting of "Coalition" Fatalities, DissidentVoice, Jan. 24, 2004. Expands on the previous article since more data has rolled in.

Landmines and unexploded ordnance

    , AP, Mar. 26, 2003. , Handicap International.
  • Kamal Ahmed, Revealed: The Cluster Bombs That Litter Iraq, Observer (London), June 1 2003: "Experts in clearing conflict zones of unexploded bombs say that millions of Iraqi adults and children are at risk, along with humanitarian aid workers, United Nations personnel, civilian staff and military officials."

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

  • Andrew Weaver and Ray McGovern, "Troops Return to Painful Wait for Needed Help,"Baltimore Sun (Common Dreams), February 4, 2007: "The California Nurses Association reported that in the first quarter of 2006, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs 'treated 20,638 Iraq veterans for post-traumatic stress disorder, and they have a backlog of 400,000 cases.' A returning soldier has to wait an average of 165 days for a VA decision on initial disability benefits, and an appeal can take up to three years."

Friendly Fire

Comment: The exact extent of friendly fire will only surface sometime in the future…

Fragging

Fragging is the killing of soldiers or officers by a fellow soldier. There already has been at least one case of this in Iraq before the war started in 2003 a soldier of "Arab" ancestry was harrassed by members of his own unit, and in response he lobbed a granade among them. In a DemocracyNow (March 2005) interview with a conscientious objector it was evident that fragging may be worrying the US army because when officers confront soldiers who voice dissent the first question they ask is: "are you intent on causing your unit bodily harm."



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