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Woman Begs Italy to Take Back “Cursed” Pompeii Artifacts

Woman Begs Italy to Take Back “Cursed” Pompeii Artifacts


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A Canadian woman has blamed her double mastectomy on “cursed” Pompeii artifacts that she stole from the famous Italian archaeological site earlier in her life. She was so convinced of their evil powers that’s she has sent them back!

Imagine living in a world where stones hold positive and negative energies, where inanimate objects can possibly be programmed by evil entities and inflict disease on those who broke any of God’s 10 divine laws. Well, this is the bizarre reality the Canadian woman, known to the media only as “Nicole” lived in. And 15 years after she stole the cursed Pompeii artifacts, she sent them back claiming they were indeed possessed of evil intentions.

Nicole Broke One Of The 10 Divine Laws: Theft!

The archaeological site of Pompeii at the foot of Mount Vesuvius in southern Italy’s Campania region, was a thriving Roman city until it was buried beneath meters of ash and pumice after the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD. Today, the city’s excavated streets and houses are an open-air museum that visitors can freely explore, and steal artifacts from, apparently.

A famous Pompeii mosaic which could be turned into thousands of "cursed" Pompeii artifacts, if you believed in bad luck and dark destiny. ( Sergii Figurnyi / Adobe Stock )

According to The Guardian , in 2005, Nicole was in her early 20s when she visited Pompeii’s archaeological park and stole two ancient mosaic tiles, “parts of an amphora and a piece of ceramics”, the theft of which she now blames for “a run of misfortune” including financial hardship and having breast cancer twice. In her enclosed letter of confession, Nicole wrote that the artifacts have “so much negative energy linked to that land of destruction,” and she pleaded with the Italian archaeological authorities to, “Please take them back, they bring bad luck,” claiming that she had learned her lesson and wanted “forgiveness from God”.

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How “Cursed” People Come To Believe In Curses

Pompeii has become one of Italy ’s most visited tourist attractions and for many years tourists shamelessly stole parts of the city. But Nicole is not the first person who has suffered the results of an alleged curse. A 2015 Vintage News article discussing the curse of Pompeii says that for “a rational mind” the people of Pompeii had misfortune coming their way by living so closing to a sleeping volcano. For “simple minded folks” the curse of Pompeii is a real thing. And according to Mail Online it is “simplemindedness” that causes a lot of thieves who stole the relics from Pompeii to mail them back to Italian authorities saying their lives have been ruined by the curse inherent in these objects, objects they stole!

This Pompeii mosaic suggest the face in the center is experiencing something that is less than pleasant, the result of a curse perhaps! (Paul Stevenson / CC BY 2.0 )

Nicole says that she is now 36-years-old and, since she stole the mosaic tiles , has had breast cancer twice, resulting in a double mastectomy, and her family experienced serious and continuous financial problems. She said, “We ’re good people and I don ’t want to pass this curse on to my family or children.” Nicole is perhaps unaware that, according to BreastCancer.org, “about 1 in 8 U.S. women (about 12%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.” Certainly, not 1 in 8 U.S. woman have visited Pompeii. Furthermore, all families will experience some form of financial hardship, even rich ones, and one of the rules of this world seems to be, good stuff often happens to bad humans and horrors occur in the lives of people that believe they are good.

This Pompeii artwork suggests the presence of good and evil. (sovach / Adobe Stock )

Biblical Archaeology Can Be Misinterpreted Or Worse!

For Ancient Origins readers, what is perhaps the most interesting aspect of this story is how someone can link breast cancer or financial hardship with archaeological artifacts, in the face of overwhelming scientific research that demonstrates cancer is caused when a body's cells begin to divide without stopping. This absence of logic indicates that Nicole perhaps doesn’t believe in science and having found no cure for her specific type of cancer she may have sought answers elsewhere. And the obvious resource for a religious woman, like Nicole, would be the Bible, the Church and other institutions or faiths.

Nicole has always had an interest in archaeology and this led her to steal the “cursed” Pompeii artifacts. And being a religious person interested in the past there can be no doubt Nicole was familiar with “Biblical Archaeology.” If you type enter the words “Pompeii” and “Curse” into the BiblicalArchaeology.org search engine an article appears entitled “ The Destruction of Pompeii—God ’s Revenge?" This suggests that the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 AD was a God sent “curse" for the Roman destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem in 70 AD.

Here we have an apparently academic religious organization pushing the medieval notion that God cursed Pompeii and modern “simpleminded folk,” as the British media refer to them. Isn’t this really the same as saying two plus two equals five?

However, in all fairness, if anyone in my family suffered from a double mastectomy I too might send all my archaeological artifacts back to their places of origin. I might also be driven to find answers, as Nicole apparently did, within the field of Biblical Archaeology , that stormy tideline where scientific facts collide with religious beliefs, where articles of faith are often more powerful than the evidence provided by empirical experimentation.


Tourist returns stolen artefacts from Pompeii ➯ter suffering curse'

A tourist who pilfered fragments from the ancient city of Pompeii 15 years ago has returned the artefacts, claiming they were “cursed”.

The Canadian woman, identified only as Nicole, sent a package containing two mosaic tiles, parts of an amphora and a piece of ceramics to a travel agent in Pompeii, in southern Italy, alongside a letter of confession.

Nicole, who was in her early 20s when she visited Pompeii’s archaeological park in 2005, blamed the theft for a run of misfortune that she had suffered in the years since, including having breast cancer twice and experiencing financial hardship.

“Please, take them back, they bring bad luck,” she wrote.

At the time of the theft, she said she wanted to have a piece of history that “nobody could have” but that the relics had “so much negative energy … linked to that land of destruction”.

Pompeii was buried in volcanic ash after the catastrophic eruption of the Mount Vesuvius in AD79 and lay buried until the 16th century, when its rediscovery transformed the understanding of life in the classical world.

The ancient site is one of Italy’s most visited attractions and for years has had to deal with the problem of tourists stealing from it.

Nicole wrote in her letter that she had learned her lesson and wanted “forgiveness from God”.

“I am now 36 and had breast cancer twice,” she said. “The last time ending in a double mastectomy. My family and I also had financial problems. We’re good people and I don’t want to pass this curse on to my family or children.”

Nicole is not the only one to repent. The package contained another confessional letter from a couple, also from Canada, along with some stones stolen from the site in 2005.

“We took them without thinking of the pain and suffering these poor souls experienced during the eruption of Vesuvius and their terrible death,” they wrote. “We are sorry, please forgive us for making this terrible choice. May their souls rest in peace.”

Over the years, so many stolen relics have been returned to the site, along with letters expressing guilt, that park officials established a museum displaying the artefacts.

Most of the time, tourists want to keep the relics as souvenirs, but some thieves have also tried to sell pieces of Pompeii online. In 2015, a brick taken from the ruins in 1958 was put up for sale on eBay.


Two bodies — master and slave — unearthed in ruins of Pompeii villa

A Canadian tourist has returned artifacts stolen from the ancient site of Pompeii claiming they were “bad luck.”

The 36-year-old woman, who was only identified as Nicole, sent a package of the relics and a note confessing to taking them to a local travel agent in Campania, Italy, the Telegraph reported.

“Take them back, please, they bring bad luck,” the woman wrote of the two mosaic pieces, a piece of ceramic and two parts of an ancient jar known as an amphora.

She said that she had snatched the artifacts in 2005 while on a trip to the tourist destination, which was preserved in part as a result of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius more than 2,000 years ago.

“I was young and stupid, and I wanted to have a piece of history that nobody had,” she wrote.

But she said after she brought the mementos home to Canada, she was struck by a series of tragic events.

She said she believes that she “stole a piece of history that had lots of negative energy inside.”

“People there died in horrible ways. Bad luck played with me and my family,” the woman wrote, explaining that she has battled breast cancer twice.

She said that she plans to return to Italy so that she could apologize in person.

“We’re good people… I just want to shake this curse off me and my family,” she wrote. “Please take these artifacts back, so I can do the right thing and mend the mistake I’ve made.”

The owner of the travel agency which received the artifacts turned them over to police, the outlet reported.

It’s unclear whether any charges will be filed against the tourist.


Tourist Returns "Cursed" Artifacts She Stole from Pompeii

As the wholesome blended family learned in the sitcom's Hawaii episodes, you can't just grab any ancient artifact you find on vacation. The thing could be cursed, and before you know it, your brother will wipe out while surfing, your maid will throw her back out during a hula lesson, and Vincent Price will hold you hostage in a cave.

Nevertheless, tourists routinely ignore the wisdom of TV reruns at southern Italy's Pompeii ruins, where a bustling Roman city was buried under volcanic ash after the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D.

Over the years, the site's archaeological excavation—which got going in earnest in the 18th century and is still active today—has received many returned artifacts accompanied by sorrowful letters of confession. So many, in fact, that the Pompeii Antiquarium, the onsite museum that tells the story of the city, has a whole exhibit dedicated to pilfered pottery and other forbidden souvenirs.

Looks like the curators need to make room for a new addition.

A Canadian tourist has mailed back two mosaic tiles, parts of a jar, and a ceramic wall piece she stole from the Archaeological Park of Pompeii in 2005.

In an accompanying letter, the woman, identified in news reports only as Nicole, writes that in the intervening 15 years, she has had nothing but trouble—and she thinks the stolen items are to blame.

“Please, take them back," the letter states, according to The Guardian, "they bring bad luck.”

Nicole relates that she was in her early 20s when she visited Pompeii, and wanted a one-of-a-kind historical memento to take home. But she now thinks it was a horrible idea to take objects with "so much negative energy" attached to them due to their association with an event that caused extensive death and destruction.

Her misfortunes since 2005 have included two bouts with cancer and money problems, according to the letter. She asks for "forgiveness from God" and expresses a hope not to "pass this curse on to my family or children.”

We'd argue that she deserves some karma points for (eventually) doing the right thing. Here's hoping her luck improves from here on out.

As for Pompeii, it's doing better lately, too. Though the site came close to joining UNESCO's list of imperiled World Heritage sites in 2013, an ambitious restoration project led to the reopening earlier this year of the fresco-filled suspected brothel known as the House of Lovers. The structure had been closed to the public for 40 years due to earthquake damage.


Woman Returns Artefacts She Stole From Pompeii, Says They ɼursed' Her For 15 Years

15 years ago, a tourist stole pieces from the ancient Italian city of Pompeii. She has now reportedly returned them saying that they 'cursed' her and her family. The Canadian woman sent the stolen ceramic fragments to a travel agent in Pompeii along with a letter of confession and a request that they be returned to the Archaeological Park of Pompeii, reports The Guardian.

The woman has been identified only as Nicole. She sent two white mosaic tiles, two pieces of amphora vase and a piece of ceramic wall, back to Pompeii. In the letter she confessed that she stole them while visiting the historic city in 2005.

CNN

‘I wanted to have a piece of history that couldn't be bought’, CNN quoted Nicole as having written in her letter. She said she was ‘young and dumb’ at the time and that the relics had ‘negative energy’.

According to her, after she returned with them to Canada, she suffered a series of misfortunes, including two bouts of breast cancer and financial hardships. ‘I am now 36 and had breast cancer twice. The last time ending in a double mastectomy. My family and I also had financial problems. We're good people and I don't want to pass this curse on to my family or children’, she reportedly said.

AFP

‘Please, take them back, they bring bad luck’, she wrote in her letter.

Except for a tile that she gave to her friend, Nicole said she returned everything she took from the ancient city of Pompeii.

In 79AD after the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, Pompeii was buried in volcanic ash. It was rediscovered in the 16th century, and it has become one of the most popular tourist destinations of Italy.

Wikimedia Commons

A spokesperson for the Archaeological Park of Pompeii reportedly said that ‘over the years, about a 100 people have returned small artefacts that they stole from the city, claiming that they cursed them or brought bad luck. A selection of letters and returned artifacts has been put on display at the Pompeii Antiquarium’.

Can it be possible that the artefacts actually curse those who steal them or take them away from the place of Pompeii or could it be a series of coincidences that so many people have suffered bad luck after stealing them?


‘Please, Take Them Back’: A Canadian Woman Returned Artifacts She Stole From Pompeii Because They Brought Her Terrible Luck

The woman wrote a heartfelt confession to accompany the stolen items.

A Canadian woman who stole artifacts from Pompeii 15 years ago has now returned them, claiming that they have brought nothing but bad luck to her family.

The 36-year-old woman, who gave only her first name of Nicole, sent a hand-written confession and apology along with the stolen objects—which include parts of an amphora vase, mosaic tiles, and shards of ceramics—to a travel agent in southern Italy, who then passed them along to officials.

“I was young and dumb,” Nicole wrote in the letter, which was first published in the Italian newspaper Il Messagerro. “I wanted to have a piece of history that couldn’t be bought. I never realized or thought about what I was actually taking. I took a piece of history captured in time that has so much negative energy attached to it.”

She goes on to explain that she associates her youthful indiscretion with a long run of bad luck, including two bouts of breast cancer, a double mastectomy, and ongoing financial issues. “We’re good people and I don’t want to pass this curse on to my family or children,” the letter concludes, “please, take them back.”

Pompeii’s own legacy of bad luck begins, of course, with its instantaneous obliteration amid Mount Vesuvius’s eruption in 79 AD, which wiped out all inhabitants. Although for many years historians believed that the residents were suffocated by the volcanic ash, excavations revealed that collapsed buildings crushed most of the people. The residents of Pompeii lived opulent, pleasure-seeking lives, and the mystery of their untimely demise has incited some to wonder if their sexual proclivities and materialistic ways somehow contributed to their death.

Nicole is not the first visitor to return objects to Pompeii that had “negative energy.” In 2015, a rash of guilt-ridden tourists sent back stones and other ceramic pieces, citing a curse that they traced back to visiting the ancient ruins. A Canadian couple also returned tokens they swiped from the site.

“We are sorry,” Nicole ended her confession, “please forgive us for making this terrible choice. May their souls rest in peace.”


Tourist Returns ‘Cursed’ Stolen Artefacts From A UNESCO World Heritage Site After 15 Years

15 years ago, a Canadian tourist took more than just memories from her trip to Pompeii, a UNESCO World Heritage site. She carried along with her the artefacts that would turn out to have ‘cursed’ her life, bringing her misfortune for the years to come.

Expressing her guilt and the troubles that have haunted her all these years in a letter, she mailed the stolen artefacts back to Pompeii.

“I wanted to have a piece of history that couldn’t be bought”

The woman, identified only as Nicole in the letter, sent a package with 2 mosaic tiles, parts of an amphora (ancient jar) and a piece of ceramics that she stole from the UNESCO World Heritage site to Pompeii’s archaeological park.

In the letter, she described how she swiped the artefacts from Pompeii back in 2005 and ever since then had suffered from health and financial issues, which she attributed to the ‘cursed’ artefacts.

Along with the package, she sent a letter in which she wrote, “ I wanted to have a piece of history that couldn’t be bought. I took a piece of history captured in a time with so much negative energy attached to it. People died in such a horrible way and I took tiles related to that kind of destruction.

Also Read: Crazy Facts About 7 Stolen Jewels From India By The British

The curse

Nicole was in her 20s when she nicked the artefacts from the ancient city, which is now one of the most popular tourist destinations in Italy, with over 2.5 million annual visitors.

After returning to Canada from her trip, she suffered from breast cancer twice. Now 36-years-old, she had to undergo a double mastectomy. Her family also suffered from financial problems.

In the letter, after specifying her health and financial problems, she asked for forgiveness for her theft, “ We are good people and I don’t want to pass this curse on to my family, my children or myself anymore. Please forgive my careless act that I did years ago .”

The ancient city of Pompeii

Pompeii is an ancient city in Italy that was buried under volcanic ash following the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79.

Excavations revealed the Roman life of the inhabitants who were buried beneath the volcanic ash. Archaeologists were even able to form moulds of the people of Pompeii, capturing their final moments before catastrophe struck.

Nearly 2,000 people died in the aftermath of the volcanic eruption. Their remains have been excavated and studied ever since the ancient buried city was re-discovered in the 16th century, providing an insight into classical times.

Nicole isn’t the only one who had stolen artefacts from the ancient city. In fact, so many historical objects have been stolen from the site that the park officials display letters and relics that were returned to Pompeii by guilty tourists.

Image Credits: Google Images

This post is tagged under: UNESCO World Heritage site, Stolen artifacts, Pompeii city, Pompeii stolen relics recovered, tourist returns cursed artefacts, cursed relics, Italy, ancient city of Pompeii, how many died in Pompeii, Mount Vesuvius, eruption artifacts, Canadian tourist, returns stolen, Canadian woman, Italy tourist


A Tourist Returned Artifacts She Took From Pompeii's Ruins After Getting Cursed

Any avid history buff or action-adventure film fan knows that the one thing you shouldn't do while visiting an ancient site is to take something that isn't yours. That's how curses start, folks. But, that doesn't stop people from doing it.

READ MORE ABOUT ARTIFACTS AND CURSES

A Canadian tourist named Nicole reportedly became the victim of a curse after taking relics when she visited the ruins of Pompeii in 2005. Seeing as Mount Vesuvius erupted and covered the city in 79 A.D., Pompeii is as ancient as it gets. Not to mention, it also doubles as a burial ground.

After suffering over a decade of bad luck, including having breast cancer twice and experiencing financial troubles, the tourist sent a package containing mosaic tiles and ceramics back to Italy. The artifacts came along with a note.

"Please take them back, they bring bad luck," she wrote. "I was young and stupid, and I wanted a piece of history that nobody had." The tourist further explained that she believed she stole pieces that had "negative energy" and that the bad luck had played with her and her family.

"We&rsquore good people &hellip I just want to get rid of this curse from myself and my family," she continued. "Please take back these artifacts so that I can do the right thing and correct the mistake I made."

READ MORE ABOUT ARTIFACTS AND CURSES

The whole thing isn't exactly new: Pompeii's park officials are sent a volume of stolen artifacts from time to time, so much so that a dedicated museum at the archeological site holds all of them.


Woman Returns Stolen Pompei Artifacts To Rid Herself Of Curse

A Canadian woman returned 5 ancient fragments she removed during a visit to the Archeological Park of Pompeii in 2005, after experiencing a long string of bad luck.

Woman who stole ‘cursed’ artefacts from Pompeii returns them after 15 years of bad luck https://t.co/2T3DVxGp1G

— The Independent (@Independent) October 12, 2020

The 36 year old woman mailed the artifacts in a package along with a note to a travel agency in Campania, Italy confessing that she stole the pieces, and has since come to believe that they are cursed.

The pieces returned included a piece of ceramic wall, two pieces of amphora vase and two mosaic tiles from the ancient city. “Take them back, please, they bring bad luck,” the woman wrote of the artifacts she returned.

She went on to explain that she took the relics as a memento during a tour of the popular Italian destination in 2005, writing “I was young and stupid, and I wanted to have a piece of history that nobody had.

Upon returning home with the stolen artifacts the woman began to have horrible experiences that she attributed to her theft.

I stole a piece of history that had lots of negative energy inside,” she wrote. “People there died in horrible ways. Bad luck played with me and my family.

The woman known simply as Nicole explained that she suffered two occurrences of breast cancer which lead to a double mastectomy. Further her family has come upon very difficult financial times.

We can’t ever seem to get ahead in life,” she wrote blaming the experience on the cursed stolen items. “I took a piece of history captured in a time with so much negative energy attached to it. People died in such a horrible way and I took tiles related to that kind of destruction.

In 79 AD a catastrophic eruption from nearby Mount Vesuvius engulfed Pompeii and its residents in volcanic rock and ash. An estimated 2000 people died in the cataclysmic event.

The extreme heat led to victims suffering from a sort of instantaneous muscle contraction leaving them frozen in various positions, and remains that are a tourist attraction to this day.

This image of a man seemingly cranking one out during the apocalyptic Pompeii event illustrates how victims were discovered.


Wikimedia Commons A woman who stole a bounty of artifacts from Pompeii mailed them back to a travel agent, along with a confession claiming that they brought her bad luck.

Pompeii is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Italy. It is also, apparently, a popular target for archaeological theft.

According to the Guardian, a travel agent in the city received an unexpected package containing a number of artifacts that had been stolen from the site of the ancient disaster.

The package came with a confession letter written by a tourist who took the artifacts illegally after visiting Pompeii 15 years ago.

The remorseful thief, identified only as a Canadian woman named Nicole, sent back a package of looted items which included two parts of an amphora, mosaic tiles, and a piece of ceramic — all snatched from Pompeii.

In her letter, Nicole wrote that she stole the historical artifacts because she wanted to have a piece of history that “nobody could have.” But she grew to regret her theft over the years as she found that the relics had “so much negative energy…linked to that land of destruction.”

Flickr Commons
Archaeological workers extract the mummified bodies of two adults and three children from Pompeii on May 1, 1961.

She went on to state that she had suffered a number of misfortunes over the last decade — including two bouts of breast cancer. She believed her bad luck was a curse brought on by the stolen artifacts.

“I am now 36 and had breast cancer twice. The last time ending in a double mastectomy,” she wrote. “My family and I also had financial problems. We’re good people and I don’t want to pass this curse on to my family or children.”

Nicole went on to note that she had learned her lesson and that she hoped to earn “forgiveness from God.”

“Take them back, please,” she pled in her letter, “they bring bad luck.”

Nicole isn’t the only light-fingered visitor Pompeii has received over the years. Within the same package was a separate set of stones that had been stolen from the site as well. Just like Nicole’s returned loot, the stones also came with a letter of confession, this one sent from a couple also from Canada.

“We took them without thinking of the pain and suffering these poor souls experienced during the eruption of Vesuvius and their terrible death,” the couple wrote. “We are sorry, please forgive us for making this terrible choice. May their souls rest in peace.”

The couple stole the stones from the Pompeii site in 2005 — the same year as Nicole. It’s unclear what relationship the woman had with the couple or whether they stole the pieces on the same trip together.

Before it became a world-famous historical site, Pompeii was once a lost city. It suffered one of the worst tragedies in ancient history when its residents were buried beneath tons of ash and volcanic debris following the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD.

Ciro Fusco/EPA via Shutterstock
Pompeii officials have received countless returned artifacts that were stolen over the years.

The bodies of those who didn’t make it out in time to escape the eruption lay beneath layers of volcanic ash for thousands of years. The lost city was rediscovered accidentally in the 18th century during the construction of a new palace for the Bourbon King of France.

The remains of Vesuvius’ victims who were buried alive in Pompeii were calcified by the layers of ash which formed a protective shell around their bodies.

The skin and soft tissue of these remains later disintegrated but the hard shell that formed over them remained, making Pompeii an eerie yet popular tourist attraction due to the bodies of victims whose final moments were immortalized like statues.

Remarkably, officials at the tourist site have received a number of returned stolen artifacts from regretful thieves over the years. As a response, officials cheekily established a museum displaying the stolen goods.

Although there’s no real proof of a ‘Pompeii curse,’ hopefully the news will deter other naughty tourists from stealing artifacts.

Next, take a look at the Roman Shrine that was uncovered at Pompeii after being buried for 2,000 years and check out the horse that was prepped to rescue victims of Pompeii — only to be buried under ash in its stable.


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